Friday, October 30, 2009

Hunting the Whitetail Rut: Tip From Last Week in the Field

Recent positive feedback on some of the tips I provided for hnting the Wisconsin Whitetail rut has prompted me to give out more secrets and tips I have found one tip to be ultra successful in the field this past week

Whitetail bucks this time of year are going off of one thing and thing only, their extra keen sense of smell. Bucks will often sit on ridges or edges of fields scanning for does, as they see their potential mate they often circle behind them and smell the ground they walk on. I watched a mature 2 1/2 - 3 year old buck stand at the edge of a field that had two does feeding. Once the does walked into the edge of the woods, the buck sprinted to exactly where the does were and stopped on a dime. From that point, the buck followed the exact path of the does. So here's the tip, when walking out to your stand, tie a string to your boot, dip or spray the string with your estrous scent of choice and before you get in your tree, tie the string on a limb that is in a shooting lane. You have just created a path of love for your big buck.

2010 Wisconsin Whitetail Deer Season Proposal: Voice Your Opinion

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource wants your opinion on the 2010 whitetail deer season. All hunters should take five minutes of their time to voice their thoughts and opinions on Wisconsin DNR 2010 whitetail season proposal. The opinion collection ends November 3rd, 2009. The proposed season(s) are noted below and here is the link to submit your comments.

http://doa.wi.gov/DNRSurveys/TakeSurvey.aspx?SurveyID=8l0H992


Overview

The proposed season framework includes:

November firearm season - Statewide 16-day beginning two Saturdays prior to the Thanksgiving holiday. CWD zone would use the same dates. Season would be the normal bucks plus variable quota system.

Archery seasons - Open statewide on the Saturday closest to September 15 and continues through the Thursday immediately prior to November firearm season. Statewide season reopens on first day of the November gun season and continuing through the second Sunday in January. In herd-control units, the archery season would continue through January 31. Bonus buck incentive (see below) for all hunters beginning December 26 through January 31 in herd control units. CWD zone would use the same dates.

Youth season - Statewide 5-day either-sex season beginning the second Saturday in October. Saturday through Wednesday. Dates will be the same as 4. and 5.

Early muzzleloader season - Statewide 5-day, antlerless-only by permit beginning the second Saturday in October. Saturday through Wednesday. Dates will be the same as 3. and 5.

October herd control firearm seasons - Herd control units only. 5-day, antlerless-only season beginning the second Saturday in October. CWD October season would use same dates. Saturday through Wednesday. Dates will be the same as 3. and 4.

October herd control firearm seasons in the Kettle Moraine State Forest - When October herd control seasons are held on lands that are part of the Kettle Moraine State Forest, the five-day season on Kettle Moraine State Forest property will begin on the Thursday nearest October 27.

Late muzzleloader season - Statewide 7-day season beginning the Monday immediately following the November firearm season (Bucks plus quota). CWD zone would use the same dates.

December firearm season - Central Forest & Farmland zones. 4-day, antlerless-only season beginning the Thursday immediately following the late muzzleloader season. Appropriate antlerless permit required. CWD zone would use the same dates.

Holiday herd control firearm season - Central Forest & Farmland zones. Herd control units only, 10-day antlerless season with a bonus buck incentive beginning December 26th.

CWD zone - same dates as outlined above. EAB season structure remains in effect in the CWD zone.

Bonus Buck Incentive - Hunters harvesting an antlerless deer in herd control units after December 25th will receive a bonus buck tag valid through the end of all deer seasons.

Public land tags - Herd control units only - Herd control tags will be specific to public or private lands. Public land tags will be limited based on the proportion of deer range under state, county, or federal ownership within herd control units.

Consider that this proposal is an alternative to the current season structure including Earn-a-Buck. Do not consider this proposal only in reference to a 9-day gun season. When you consider your support for or opposition to this proposal, please consider it in the context of comparing this proposal to the herd management tools that are currently in place including Earn-a-Buck. This proposal is intended to be an alternative herd control tool for a two year trial period.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource
http://doa.wi.gov/DNRSurveys/TakeSurvey.aspx?SurveyID=8l0H992

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Deer carcass tag tip sheet available

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource
MADISON – There are some important deer carcass tagging changes in 2009 that hunters will want to pay attention to, according to Department of Natural resources wildlife biologists and wardens.

Hunters can print out a handy color tip sheet [PDF] on tagging their deer from the DNR Web site or request a copy from a DNR service center. Information on carcass tags is also available in the 2009 Wisconsin Deer Hunting Regulations pamphlet or by calling the DNR Call Center at 1-888-936-7463.

Gun deer hunters
After a number of years of herd control and earn-a-buck rules in the north, many northern deer management units are Regular units in 2009. To shoot an antlerless deer in Regular units, gun deer hunters must purchase a unit-specific ($12 for residents and $20 for non-residents) antlerless deer tag. Some Regular units will not have any unit-specific antlerless tags available in 2009; some have already sold out; and others are expected to sell out. Hunters are urged to check early and to be sure they understand the rules and have the right tags for their unit.
The “Antlerless Deer Carcass Tag” that is included with a gun deer hunting license is valid only in Herd Control and CWD (EAB) units.

As in the past, there is an unlimited number of $2 antlerless deer tags available for Herd Control units for hunters wishing to harvest additional deer for personal use or for donation to the Venison Donation program.

Licensed gun and archery hunters, hunting in CWD units may pick up free CWD Deer Carcass Tags at all DNR Service Centers, and select DNR licensing locations and registration stations throughout the CWD Management Zone.

Archery deer hunters
Archery hunters receive two antlerless carcass tags with their license. The “Archery Antlerless Carcass Tag” is good for any unit statewide during an open archery season. If this tag is used, archery hunters in Regular units may also purchase the $12 unit-specific antlerless tags if there are any available for the unit they will be hunting in. The “Antlerless Deer Carcass Tag,” which is identical to the tag received by gun license buyers, is good only in Herd Control and CWD (EAB) units.

Buck stickers
Some hunters received a yellow Buck Authorization Sticker after registering an antlerless deer in an earn-a-buck or CWD unit in 2008. If the sticker was not used in 2008 to validate a buck harvest tag, it is still valid for the 2009 deer hunting season but only in a CWD Management Zone unit where earn-a-buck hunting rules are still in effect for 2009. After the 2009 hunting season, the yellow sticker will be invalid. If an antlerless deer is harvested and registered within a CWD Management Unit during any 2009 hunting season, the hunter must request a “2009-2010 Earn-a-Buck, Buck Authorization” sticker at the deer registration station. Buck Authorization stickers will not be mailed to hunters as they have for certain situations in the past.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Keith Warnke - (608) 264-6023 or Bob Manwell - (608) 264-9248
Source: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource Website http://dnr.wi.gov/news/DNRNews_Lookup.asp?id=193#art2

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Hunting the Whitetail Rut: Tips for the Full Rut Phase

Good tips for hunting the whitetail rut require the hunter to adapt to different whitetail deer behaviors as the rut moves from phases to pase. Here are some good tips for hunting the peak of the rut also known as the "full rut."

  • Bucks typically will hang out with a doe for 24-36 hours. A good tip here is to to set up on a highly traveled doe trail. Scouting will help determine a great site to set up on but if you dont have time to scout, pick a food source or a water hole. Doe's will continue to travel trails that lead to common food and water sources if they are not being chased. Since daylight is becoming less of an abundance, set up further in the woods so you have more time to get a shot.
  • During the rut, bucks will often find a mate and bed down together. This helps both the buck and doe conceal their identity and remove the risk for conflict with other bucks. Check scrapes and rubs as these can often be more of a sign of a bedding area more than a scrape or rub line.
  • Bucks often will reduce their workload by simply watching and listening, and this may be done with little travel at all. Doe's will often let bucks know if they are interested or not. If she is not she may simply urinate on the ground to let the buck identify that she is not in estrus. If she is interested she will hold her tail straight out and walk in a stiff legged trot. Ridgelines and hilltops allow for bucks to do this surveying with little travel, set up just off of the ridge and do a little estrus bleat and listen up, he may be closer than you think.
  • Here is a neat trick to try, does in estrus will respond well to grunts during the peak rut. If you see does, try grunting them in. Once the does are within 30 - 40 yards, try using a soft estrus bleat. You are basically telling the bucks that may be watching, exactly what they want to hear without the does really even telling him.
  • Open areas may be your best opportunity during this phase. Dominant bucks care about one thing and one thing only, women. If you were the big boy on campus, you can show your stuff off by hiding in the woods, you want the women to see you. Watch the edges of open areas and fields as dominant bucks may take the road less traveled to help improve his visibility to women.

Monday, October 26, 2009

Trail Cam Videos: Whitetails and Bears

From whitetail bucks to big ol bears, the northland trail cam is starting to pick up some great video clips.

One of my trailcams that is positioned in Cameron Wisconsin had some intersting videos this week. Bigger whitetail bucks are starting to move as I figured they would with the rut starting to pick-up. What a big suprise to see the bear crawling across the trail. Enjoy.


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Wednesday, October 21, 2009

2009 Whitetail Pre-Rut Tips

I wrote a post about a week ago about hunting the rut and the general overview of the rut phases. After being in the field the last week I have noticed a few key indicators that the pre-rut phase is upon us.

Key indicators I have found this past week to give me hope that the greatest time on earth is upon us were bucks traveling rub lines, fresh scrapes, and bucks sparing.

Here are some tips for hunting the pre-rut phase and if you have more, please add a comment and I will gladly add it to the list of tips.

Rub Lines and Scrapes
Bucks are becoming individuals this time of year and as they break away from their bachelor groups, they also define their location and travel lines by leaving behind rubs on trees and scrapes on the ground. This only lasts a week to three weeks so scout quickly and set up about 10 - 15 yards off the line.

Sparing
As I witnessed two young bucks a month ago sparing I knew that the pre-rut is close but young bucks are like young boys in the school yard, they will spare for fun. This last week, I watched a mid-sized 2 year old 8 pointer spare with another 2 - 3 year old 8 pointer. This is a key indicator that more mature bucks are starting to feel the need to determine dominance.

Small bucks running does
You will start to see smaller bucks running does during the pre-rut. The noise in the woods from these small chases may keep mature bucks bedded down briefly, but at some point the big boys have to get up and play as well. Hunt the ridge lines as the smart mature bucks will spectate these chases and eventually start to take over.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Comparison of 2009 over-winter deer population estimates to population goals

Below is the Wisconsin DNR map of the 2009 over-winter deer population estimates compared to the actual DNR's whitetail deer population goals.

The map compares estimated deer populations to population goals offers a view into how population estimates are used to determine season structures.




To view a large map, please visit: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/wildlife/hunt/deer/post_hunt_pop.pdf

Friday, October 16, 2009

Youth Hunt Yields Old Bucks

Wisconsin's youth hunt provided for youngster to hit the woods and bag a trophy. For these two girls, it may be a trophy of a lifetime.


Haley Taylor, 13, of Brussels, shot this 10-point buck with an 18-inch inside spread while hunting with her dad, Tim, in the state's youth hunt mid-morning Saturday in Door County.
Picutre provided by Greenbay Press Gazette



Abi Fredrich, 10, of Brussels, shot this 10-point buck with a 17-inch inside spread while hunting with her mom, Patti Bissen-Taylor, in the state's youth hunt around 9:30 a.m. Sunday in Door County.
Picutre provided by Greenbay Press Gazette

Thursday, October 15, 2009

2009 Whitetail Deer Hunting Season Structure

I was discussing with a colleague the seasons that we have this year for deer hunting and although we could have easily just looked them up, we thought this would be a great post for the blog. Below you will find the whitetail deer hunting seasons in 2009.
  • Archery season: September 12 to January 3 (Earn-a-buck)
  • Youth Season: October 10-11 (exempt from earn-a-buck)
    (Archery hunters can continue to bow hunt but must follow normal gun deer season blaze orange guidelines)
  • Early firearm season: October 15-18 (antlerless-only)
  • Traditional 9-day firearm season: November 21-29 (Earn-a-buck)
  • 10-day muzzleloader-only season: November 30 to December 9 (Earn-a-buck)
  • Late firearm season: December 10-13 (antlerless-only)
  • Holiday firearm season: December 24-January 3 (Earn-a-buck)

Anterless Deer Hunt October 15th - October 18th

Antlerless deer hunt in earn-a-buck, CWD, and most herd control deer management units begins today October 15th running through Sunday October 18th.

Below is the map of the units that are open for the anterless hunt.


To view a larger map, follow this link: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/wildlife/hunt/deer/dmu.htm

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Wisconsin Deer Baiting and Wildlife Feeding Regulations

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resource WM-456-2008

I have been in some serious discussions with hunters in the past two - three years about what is the rule, what is right, and what is wrong with baiting whitetail deer. I have almost done a 360 about ten times and even though I have opinions on what is wrong, it only matters that I follow the restrictions that the Wisconsin DNR provided me. I have included it below to help my fellow hunters get the information they are debating over. Until the rules change, these are what we should and are supposed to follow.


Counties where baiting and feeding IS prohibited (shaded counties):
Remainder of the state – where baiting and feeding deer is NOT prohibited (non-shaded counties):

Baiting Wild Animals - For hunting purposes is prohibited.
No person may place, use or hunt over bait or feed material for the purpose of hunting any wild animals (except deer as provided below and for bear, see Wisconsin Bear Hunting Regulations) unless authorized by a special permit or license issued by the department.

Scents: Scent may be used for hunting deer or other wild animals, but the scent may not be placed or deposited in a manner that it is accessible for consumption by deer, and scents shall be removed daily at the end of hunting hours established for deer. However, two ounces or less of scent may be placed, used or deposited in any manner for hunting game and does not need to be removed daily at the end of hunting hours.

Natural Vegetation and Plantings: You may hunt with the aid of material deposited by natural vegetation or material found solely as a result of normal agricultural or gardening practices, or with the aid of crops planted and left standing as wildlife food plots.

Feeding Wild Animals - For Non-Hunting Purposes is Prohibited.
No person may place, deposit or allow the placement of any material to feed or attract wild animals for non-hunting purposes including recreational and supplemental feeding, except as allowed below for birds and small mammals.

Feeding Birds and Small Mammals: Material may be placed solely for the purpose of attracting and feeding wild birds and small mammals if:

• Placed in bird feeding devices and structures at a sufficient height or design to prevent access by deer, and
• The structures and devices are within 50 yards of a dwelling devoted to human occupancy.
• When deer, bear or elk are found to be utilizing bird feeding devices or structures, the devices or structures shall be enclosed or elevated higher to prevent access by deer.
Note: The placement of plain water for drinking or for birdbaths is allowed.

Feeding Animals by Hand: Feeding of wild animals, other than deer, elk or bear, by hand is not encouraged, but is allowed if:
• Feed is placed not more than 30 feet away from the person feeding.
• The person feeding cleans up the unconsumed feed before moving a distance greater than 30 feet from the deposited feed.

Natural Vegetation and Plantings: Feed that is deposited by natural vegetation or found solely as a result of normal agricultural or gardening practices, as well as standing crops planted and left standing as wildlife food plots that may be used by wild animals, is not considered feeding for the purposes of these regulations and is allowed statewide.

Baiting Wild Animals - For hunting purposes is prohibited. No person may place, use or hunt over bait or feed material for the purpose of hunting any wild animals (except deer as provided below and for bear, see Wisconsin Bear Hunting Regulations) unless authorized by a special permit or license issued by the department.

Scents: Scent may be used for hunting deer or other wild animals, but the scent may not be placed or deposited in a manner that it is accessible for consumption by deer, and scents shall be removed daily at the end of hunting hours established for deer. However, two ounces or less of scent may be placed, used or deposited in any manner for hunting game and does not need to be removed daily at the end of hunting hours.

Natural Vegetation and Plantings: You may hunt with the aid of material deposited by natural vegetation or material found solely as a result of normal agricultural or gardening practices, or with the aid of crops planted and left standing as wildlife food plots.

Deer Baiting – What is Allowed For Deer Hunting Purposes

Amount: No person may place, use or hunt over more than 2 gallons of bait or feed at any feeding site.

Placement: No person may place, use or hunt over:
• More than 2 gallons of bait on each contiguous area of land under the same ownership that is less than 40 acres in size, or for each full 40 acres that make up a contiguous area of land under the same ownership. (Note: Parcels of land that do not touch but are separated only by a town, county or state highway are considered contiguous.) Note: Feed at feeding sites may be spread out or divided into more than one pile as long as the total amount of feed material is not more than 2 gallons per forty acres.
• Any feeding site that is located within 100 yards of any other feeding site located on the same contiguous area of land under the same ownership.
• Any feeding site if the person doing the hunting is within 100 yards of more than 2 gallons of bait or feed located on the same parcel of land.
• Any feeding site that is located within 50 yards of any trail, road, or campsite used by the public, or within 100 yards from a roadway, having a posted speed limit of 45 miles per hour or more.

Timing: No person may:
• Place, use or hunt over bait or feed during the closed season for hunting deer, but may start to place bait for deer hunting 24 hours prior to the deer archery and the deer gun seasons. (Note: The 24-hour period is the period from 12:00 am to 11:59 pm on the day immediately before the season.)
• Hunt over bait or a feeding site that is in violation of these regulations, unless the area is completely free of bait or feed material for at least 10 consecutive days prior to hunting, pursuing animals or dog training.

Content: No person may place use or hunt over any bait or feed material that:
• Contains any animal part or animal by-product.
• Is contained in or deposited by a feeder that is designed to deposit or replenish feed automatically, mechanically, or by gravity.
• Contains or is contained within, metal, paper, plastic, glass, wood or other similar processed materials. This does not apply to bait or feed placed in hollow logs
or stumps (see Wisconsin Bear Hunting Regulations) or to scent materials.
License: No person may use or hunt over bait or feed material placed for deer without possessing an appropriate valid archery or gun deer license and unused carcass tag.

Feeding Wild Animals – Allowed for Certain Species for Non-Hunting Purposes with the Following Restrictions:

FEEDING DEER:
Amount: No person may place or allow the placement of more than 2 gallons of feed material at any feeding site.

Placement: No person may place or allow the placement of:
• More than 2 gallons of feed for each owner-occupied residence or business, regardless of property size.
• A deer feeding site more than 50 yards from an owner occupied residence or business.
• A deer feeding site within 100 yards from a roadway having a posted speed limit of 45 miles per hour or more.
• A deer feeding site without the approval of the owner of the owner-occupied residence or business.
• Feed at a deer feeding site that the person knows is being used by bear and elk. If the owner of the residence or business is notified by the department or otherwise
becomes aware that bear or elk have been using a deer feeding site, the owner must discontinue feeding for a period of not less than 30 days.

No person may place any bait or feed material for deer that:
• Contains any animal part or animal by-product.
• Is contained in or deposited by a feeder that is designed to deposit or replenish feed automatically, mechanically, or by gravity.

FEEDING OTHER WILD ANIMALS: No person may place, deposit or allow the placement of any material to feed or attract other wild animals for nonhunting purposes including recreational and supplemental feeding, except as allowed below for feeding birds and small mammals.

FEEDING BIRDS AND SMALL MAMMALS:
Material may be placed solely for the purpose of attracting and feeding wild birds and small mammals if:
• Placed in bird feeding devices and structures at a sufficient height or design to prevent access by deer, and
• The structures and devices are no further than 50 yards from a dwelling devoted to human occupancy.
• If deer, bear or elk are utilizing bird feeding devices or structures, the devices or structures shall be enclosed or elevated higher to prevent access by the deer, bear or elk.
Note: The placement of plain water for drinking or for birdbaths is allowed.

Feeding Animals by Hand: Feeding of wild animals, other than deer, elk or bear, by hand is not encouraged, but is allowed if:
• Feed is placed not more than 30 feet away from the person feeding.
• The person feeding cleans up the unconsumed feed before moving a distance greater than 30 feet from the deposited feed.

Natural Vegetation and Plantings: Feed that is deposited by natural vegetation or found solely as a result of normal agricultural or gardening practices, as well asstanding crops planted and left standing as wildlife food plots that may be used by wild animals, is not considered feeding for the purposes of these regulations and is allowed statewide.

Definitions:
Animal part or animal by-product means honey, bones, fish, meat, solid animal fat, animal carcass or parts of animal carcasses, but does not include liquid scents.
Bait means any material placed or used to attract wild animals, including liquid scent (includes salt and mineral blocks); does not include plain drinking water.
Bird feeding devices and structures means any device or structure that has the primary purpose of attracting or feeding birds or small mammals.
Business means a building used primarily to carry out commercial activities at which regular scheduled business hours are maintained for employees and the public such as restaurants and retail stores, but does not include associated lands, warehouses, outbuildings or other buildings that are not normally open to the public.
Feed means any material that may attract or be consumed by wild animals that is placed for any non-hunting purposes including recreational and supplemental feeding, but does not include plain drinking water.
Feeding site means any location or area in which bait or feed is placed or deposited or that contains bait or feed material used to attract wild animals for recreational
and supplemental feeding or for hunting purposes.
Hunt over means hunting within 100 yards of any feeding site where a person knows or reasonably should know that the area contains a feeding site.
Owner-occupied residence means a dwelling or building devoted to human occupancy when used while feeding deer as a residence by the owner, members of the owners immediate family, or when used as a residence by individuals as a rental property while feeding deer.
Roadway means that portion of a highway between the regularly established curb lines or that portion which is improved, designed or ordinarily used for vehicular travel, excluding the berm or shoulder.
Scent means any material, except animal parts or animal by-products, used to attract wild animals solely by its odor.
Small mammal means all mammals other than bear, deer and elk.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources provides equal opportunity in its employment, programs, services and functions under an Affirmative Action Plan. If you have any questions, please write to Equal Opportunity Office, Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. 20240.
This publication is available in Braille, audio cassette, large print or computer format upon request. To order, call 608-266-8204.

NOTE: Additional Counties may be included in the ban if: 1) A CWD Management zone is established in the county or a portion of the county, or; 2) A new CWD
or bovine tuberculosis positive captive or free-roaming, domestic or wild animal is confirmed in the county, or; 3) The county or portion of the county is within a 10 mile radius of a new captive or free-roaming, domestic or wild animal that has been tested and confirmed to be positive for CWD or bovine tuberculosis.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Tips for Hunting the Whitetail Rut: Its about that time

Tips for Hunting the Whitetail Rut: Its about that time

In Wisconsin, the best time of year for whitetail hunting is somewhere between now and then. I am sure you are thinking, that sounds ridiculous. Well...it is. The "rut" or otherwise known is the pre, peak, and post breeding moments of the whitetail season.

Everyone has their opinion as to how to hunt the rut but no one person has yet to determine the actual exact peak time. You can assume that the rut phases will be somewhere between September - January but beyond that, pinpointing the exact peak is pretty much a guess as much as it is science.

With that degree of difficulty set in your mind I have compiled a few of the most common tips that everyone can assume will payoff in the field one way or another during the rut season.

1. Hunt areas where there are lots of does. If the women are there, men will come running.

2. Hunt the day. During the rut, even during the day bucks will often move towards the smell of sweet doe. Sounds crazy, but its been proven, so grab a sandwich and stay in your stand for most of the day.

3. During the rut, using a grunt call sometimes doesn't get the attention of the bucks as they are busy chasing estrus does. Therefore, put yourself in prime location to intercept a buck in his travels in looking for a doe. This is best done on rub and scrape lines.

4. Set up shop near a watering hole. Bucks may not feed as often during the rut, but they sure do get thirsty when running all day. Watering holes a great secret that seems to never be told. Probably because it works.

5. Create mock scrapes and mock rubs...for dominant bucks this is a sign that there is someone else trying to get his doe's.

6. If you were looking for women in the woods, where would you go? That's right, at the top of the hill so you can get a better view of the opposite sex. Try a ridge line, bucks may travel this in hopes of pinpointing the love of his life.

7. Ah...the sweet smell of love...there are hundred, maybe thousands of options when it comes to lures, scents, sticks, etc.. try a few doe scent options, not one will be the best, but when you diversify your scents, you reduce your risk of not seeing the big guy.

I hope these tips will help and if you have more, please feel free to leave a comment on this post and I will gladly add it to this list. The more help the better....right?

Friday, October 9, 2009

30 Pointer in Fond Du Lac: More Photos

30 Pointer in Fond Du Lac
Photo credits Patrick Flood from the Reporter

Wayne Schumacher of Fond du Lac
Unofficial count of 30-points
20 and a 1/2 inch spread
Weight of 225 pounds.













St. Croix County Buck Shot in Somerset, WI

Shot Wed. afternoon near Somerset in St. Croix County. This guy has killed some tremendous bucks the last couple years. He shot a gross 180"archery buck near New Richmond last year, and a gross 175" gun buck on thefarm this one was shot at. This is probably a top 5 typical for thestate of WI!!!!Dan Bernarde St. Croix County September 17th 210lbs.Gross 192"Net 184"24" inside spread

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Wisconsin Public Land Giant

“Unofficially” green scores:
189 1/8 Gross
184 5/8 Net
Weighed in at 250lbs. field dressed
Shot on public land near Menomonie, Wi





















Antlerless Deer (Bonus) Carcass Tags Availability for 2009

Antlerless Deer (Bonus) Carcass Tags Availability for 2009
WI DNR Website

The 2009 Antlerless Deer Permits and State Park Access Permits will go on sale in August.

Tags can be purchased at the rate of one permit per person per day until the unit is sold out or the hunting season ends.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22nd AT NOON – Even numbered regular units and even-numbered State Park units will go on sale until midnight. Any remaining permits will go on sale again on Monday, August 24 until sold out or the hunting season ends.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23rd AT NOON – Odd numbered regular units and odd numbered State Park units will go on sale and will remain on sale until sold out or the hunting season ends.

Contact your local license agent for days and hours of operation. Click click here to find a license agent.MONDAY,

AUGUST 24th – All remaining permits will be on sale until sold out or until the hunting season ends.

These permit levels are preliminary and are subject to change.

Go to the following DNR link to view permits available by unit : http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cs/bonusavailability.htm

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Youth gun deer hunt Oct. 10-11

Youth gun deer hunt Oct. 10-11
Wisconsin DNR Website

MADISON - The eighth annual Youth Gun Deer Hunt will take place Oct. 10-11 and is aimed at giving youths more deer-hunting opportunity.

Starting in 2009, Wisconsin’s new Mentored Hunting Law allows hunters as young as 10 years of age with or without hunter education certification, to participate in the youth gun deer hunt with a mentor.

The early date of the hunt provides milder weather allowing more time in the field under more comfortable conditions for the youngsters and their hunting mentors. In addition to giving youths their own opportunity to experience the traditions of deer hunting in Wisconsin, the focus is on the youth and allows more time for the mentor to share skills and teach their charges how to hunt safely and ethically.

The hunt will be held in all deer management units (DMUs) statewide, except State Park units, Ft. McCoy, Chambers Island, Menomonee and the Apostle Islands other than Madeline Island.

How to participate

Wisconsin now has two programs designed to introduce youths to deer hunting under controlled conditions and under close supervision of an adult hunter.

Youth hunters 12 - 15 years of age (resident and non-resident) who possess a hunter education certificate of accomplishment and a gun deer hunting license may hunt deer October 10 -11 accompanied by an adult 18 years of age or older. To “accompany” means the adult is within both visual and voice contact of the youth. The adult does not have to be a licensed hunter or a hunter education graduate to accompany 1 or 2 youth who are at least 12 years of age and have completed a hunter education course.

Adults accompanying youth hunters may not “gun hunt” for deer during the youth hunt, but may possess a bow or gun and hunt for a game species that is open for them to hunt at that time.
An adult may not accompany more than two youth hunters during the youth gun deer hunt at any given time.

Youth hunters 10-11 years of age, or youth hunters 12-15 years of age who do not possess a hunter education certificate, but possess a gun deer hunting license must be “mentored” by an adult who is within arm’s reach at all times during the hunt.

Qualified adult mentors must be at least 18 years of age and have the youth’s parent or guardian’s permission to mentor the youth hunter.

Mentors must possess a valid hunting license for the current year (any type of game).
If the mentor was born on or after Jan. 1, 1973, they must be a graduate of a hunter education course or have completed basic training with the U.S. Armed Forces.

Qualified adult mentors may only mentor one youth hunter who is age 10 or 11, or who has not completed hunter education at any given time.

Only one firearm may be possessed between the mentor and youth who is age 10 or 11, or who has not completed hunter education, if participating in the youth gun deer hunt.

One adult may not accompany more than 2 youth hunters. If one youth is under the “mentored hunter” rules, the adult may “accompany” no more than one other youth at the same time and only if the 2nd youth is at least 12-15 years of age and has completed hunter education.
Qualified youth hunters may harvest one buck deer on their gun buck deer carcass tag and additional antlerless deer with the appropriate carcass tag. Earn-a-buck restrictions do not apply in EAB units during the youth hunt. All hunters and their mentors must observe blaze orange clothing requirements.

All deer, bear, and small game hunters, with the exception of waterfowl hunters, also are required to meet blaze orange requirements on these two days.

More information on the youth deer hunt and Mentored Hunting Law is available on the DNR Web site and in the 2009 Wisconsin Deer Hunting Regulations .

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Fleener - (608) 261-7589 or Bob Manwell - (608) 264-9248